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CARVER, Local Horror Film Phenomenon, to Open Second Annual REEL EAST FILM FESTIVAL, August 21-23, 2015

Oaklyn, NJ –  Carver, the horror film phenomenon directed by teen wunderkind Emily DiPrimio, will open the Second Annual Reel East Film Festival (REFF) for a 7:30 screening on August 21, 2015 at the historic Ritz Theatre in Oaklyn, NJ. South Jersey native DiPrimio will introduce the film, with a Q and A to follow. The full festival will run from August 21-23, with more featured guests to be announced.

In the tradition of the past returning to haunt the present, Carver features a group of teens who regret a despicable act they committed years earlier. Their actions had left three dead, and now, on the anniversary of the crimes, an ominous carved pumpkin is found at each of their homes. Revenge may come in human or nonhuman form in this suspenseful tale of dread by a fresh new voice in filmmaking. 

Carver will be one of many features filling out the festival. Submissions are still open: along with our features, we are looking for unique short films to program, 40 minutes and under, in the following categories: Narrative, Documentary, Experimental, Student and Animated. We are also accepting feature films of 60 minutes or longer in two categories: Independent Feature Film and Regional Independent Film. International submissions are also welcomed. The short films, the student short films, and the feature films will be in competition for several awards, including an Audience Award, to be presented on the day of the festival.

To submit your film, visit www.filmfreeway.org/festival/ReelEastFilmFestival

DEADLINES:


All Short Films excluding Student Shorts:

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

Better-Late-Than-Never Deadline: July 31, 2015

Student Short Film:

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

Better-Late-Than-Never Deadline: July 31, 2015

Independent Feature Film:

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

Better-Late-Than-Never Deadline: July 31, 2015

Regional Independent Feature Film:

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

Better-Late-Than-Never Deadline: July 31, 2015

About the REFF:

In its second year, the Reel East Film Festival is committed to providing a forum for both established and up and coming filmmakers to showcase their work. Presented by the Camden County Board of Freeholders and Rutgers-Camden Film Studies, REFF screens independent films from around the world, while also focusing on the work of local filmmakers in the Camden County and Southern New Jersey area. The Reel East Film Festival will be held August 21-23, 2015, at the Ritz Theatre in Oaklyn, NJ.

New Jersey’s rich cinematic history continues to provide an inspiration for great films. Located just miles from Philadelphia, the REFF will feature screenings of new and classic films, discussions and related events. Over the course of three days/nights in August, this weekend festival will give viewers the opportunity to meet regional and visiting filmmakers. The REFF serves area residents, visitors, students, local businesses and the regional film community. Committed to a global perspective and the power of storytelling, the festival will feature independent films of all levels and genres. We’re proud to offer an insider’s view of a democratic industry.

Contact: reeleastfilm@gmail.com
Short Film Submissions at Film Freeway (Fee: $25, Students: $15)
Feature Film Submissions at Film Freeway (Fee: Independent Feature: $50, Regional Independent Feature: $45)
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TO ORDER TICKETS FOR CARVER and other REEL EAST FESTIVAL SCREENINGS:
 
 
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I don't know if I really need to introduce you to this movie called THE ROOM. If you haven't heard about it, you probably wouldn't be interested in it and if you have heard about it, there's little I can add to what has already been said. Almost obscuring the film itself is the gigantic personality of its writer/director/star Tommy Wiseau. 

Wiseau is in Philadelphia this week to present the 12th Anniversary screening of THE ROOM over two nights-this Friday night July10th and Saturday night July 11th at midnight at the Landmark Ritz at the Bourse. For more information or to order tickets go to THE ROOM at the Ritz.

Tommy Wiseau was kind enough to let me toss him some questions. I must admit that I had some preconceptions about how the interview might go after years of watching other interviews with him but he was surprisingly honest, direct, and quite likable. 

Hello Tommy Wiseau! How are things going? Do you like Philadelphia?


Oh yes, I’ve been here several times before. Lots of beautiful architecture, I think you could compare some of the areas to San Franscisco..

I’d like to start off by talking about some of your newer projects. The Neighbors for example? Can you tell me what that’s all about?


It’s a situation comedy/soap opera of sorts about a group of characters who live in the same apartment building. I play Charlie who is actually the building manager and there are relationships between the various characters. It’s basically relationships and interaction between different people. 

Is it still streaming on Hulu?


Yes. Absolutely. We have a contract with Hulu and you can go to www.theneighborssitcom.com to see the trailer. There’s also a “Neighbors” channel on youtube where you can see various clips. We will also be screening it after THE ROOM this Friday and Saturday night.The program has been submitted to the TV Emmy Awards-so cross your fingers everyone! 

Now THE ROOM has been talked about and analyzed about as much as CITIZEN KANE at this point . But just on a basic gut level I have to tell you that when I first saw it, I was so stunned and overwhelmed by it. I don’t think I laughed so hard since I saw MIDNIGHT 2 by John Russo. So on a basic level, I think that there has to be something said for creating a film that has inspired such enthusiasm and given such pleasure to so many people. Was entertaining the audience first and foremost on your mind when you made the film?


Yes, Brian, that was what I had hoped for the film. We actually just had the 12th anniversary of THE ROOM so I guess I did something right because people still enjoy it.  You know it’s a different cookie cutter from Hollywood. Always tell your friends that if they are seeing THE ROOM for the first time, it’s a different cookie cutter from Hollywood so you may not like it but that’s OK with Tommy. 

I’ve heard that THE ROOM started as a play, then became a novel before finally becoming a film. After all that time with the story and characters, when the film was finished, did you expect the reaction you received?


No. Not at all. As a filmmaker my vision was slightly different. The way it came out, I think it was sort of destiny I would say. But when I made the movie, I always thought about how to make it different. People are always complaining how the movies from Hollywood are the same-over and over. Lets just try to do something different. You probably heard the stories too-which are true-of how I had to replace the cast and crew several times in order to make the film I wanted to make. I actually had 4 Directors of Photography. Years later people would come out of nowhere asking for credit on THE ROOM and I would say, “Who are you?” because they quit or whatever. But it was really intended to be something for me to show my acting and directing and writing . Now with something like THE NEIGHBORS I think you can see some flavor ofTHE ROOM in it. That’s my style. 

Was it your writing, directing or acting that you really wanted to feature with the film?

Well, I had studied acting for years with Jean Shelton. 85 years old and still teaching now. So yes, I wanted the acting but it was really the script, the story. It’s strange but for years people were trying to claim that there was no script, that it was all just made up on the set, so I said enough is enough and we just put the script up on the website for everyone to see. So you can go to www.tommywiseau.com and you can read it. 

So those people who are bashing THE ROOM or putting my personality down, they are losers basically. Because I am open about everything. I am right here. I may have an accent but so what! 

Since the time you first made THE ROOM and then saw the reaction to it-people saw it as a midnight movie or a cult film-they clearly reacted to the the perceived camp aspects of it-was this something you intended to do? 

That’s a very good question, Brian. I have to say that lots of people can get in your way. I have a certain vision which I want to present to the public. I want to present something the way I want to present it not the way other people want to influence me. I told you earlier that I had to lay off some people. I had to say, “Hey gentlemen we have nothing to talk about-it’s going to be done my way.”  

So I see you have several new projects-

Yes! I am working on my new film FORECLOSURE which will hopefully be ready by October and will be submitted to the Academy Awards. We actually submitted THE ROOM to the Academy as well but we never heard anything from it. But you have to try. So I have FORECLOSURE , THE NEIGHBORS as well as a music video. I’m editing the music video right now in fact. Very busy these days. 

Now when you are working on your new projects, do you find it hard to approach them as purely as you did with THE ROOM?  In other words have you been affected by the way the world has reacted to your work?

No, because basically I don’t think that way. I don’t think about reaction so much as original creation. So I always think that if you present something original, people can appreciate it. But if you turn around and say what is the commercial value of your product I don’t think that is the right way to go about it. So I don’t think, “let me check this or that”, I think, “What is my approach based on the script?” How do I see this scene myself outside of the way others do it. I think that if you present something original you have a much better chance of finding an audience. 

Ok, so given your approach to filmmaking, what do you make of some of the criticisms of THE ROOM which seem to insinuate that you made the film as a joke? That you were intentionally pulling our legs?

I would say that I believe in my original material. This is why I’ve posted the script up on my website. I want people to understand that it was always my intention to make the film that I made. It comes out of who I am, what I wanted to present to the world. I always say look at yourself in the mirror and ask yourself what can you offer the world. I offer the world happiness. At the same time I want the public to learn about themselves.  That’s what you see in THE ROOM.Two’s better but three’s a crowd you know. 

-Brian Holcomb, Reel East Film Society
 
 
John A. Berton teaches at Drexel University. But before he started clocking time at the Westphal College of Media Art and Design as an assistant professor of animation and visual effects, he hung out with dinosaurs and cyborgs.

Berton worked on the the visual effects teams for both Jurassic Park and Terminator 2: Judgment Day (the face-morphing effect? That's all Berton). Both movies receive sequels this summer - Jurassic World (Berton saw it the night before he was interviewed last week) and Terminator: Genisys, in theaters Wednesday. (In addition, he's worked on everything from The Mummy to Charlotte's Web to a 1997 rerelease of Star Wars.)

Berton talked to The Inquirer about why these sequels are coming out now, and about being "spellbound in the darkness."

Read Molly Eichel's interview with Berton at Philly.com 
 
 
The Reel East Film Festival is seeking exciting, uncompromising and unique visions from around the world to present at our Second Annual event at the historic Ritz Theatre in Oaklyn, NJ on August 21-23, 2015. We are looking for short films in the following categories: Narrative, Documentary, Experimental, Student and Animated. All short films must be less than 40 minutes to qualify. This year, we are also accepting feature films of 60 minutes or longer in two categories: Independent Feature Film and Regional Independent Feature Film. Featured guests will soon be announced.

To submit your film, visit FILMFREEWAY.COM

DEADLINES:

All Short Films excluding Student Shorts:

Early Deadline: May 8, 2015

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

Better-Late-Than-Never Deadline: July 31, 2015

Student Short Film:

Early Deadline: May 8, 2015

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

BetterLateThanNever Deadline: July 31, 2015

Independent Feature Film:

Early Deadline: May 8, 2015

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

BetterLateThanNever Deadline: July 31, 2015

Regional Independent Feature Film:

Early Deadline: May 8, 2015

Regular Deadline: July 17, 2015

BetterLateThanNever Deadline: July 31, 2015

About the Festival:

In its second year, the Real East Film Festival (directed by Interview Editor Matthew Sorrento, among others) is committed to providing a forum for both established and up and coming filmmakers to showcase their work.  Last year, famed director, John Sayles (Return of the Secaucus 7, The Brother From Another Planet, Passion Fish and Matewan) screened his film, Go For Sisters, which was followed by a post-screening Q&A. The festival also featured many documentaries that pertained to film and comic book history, such as Inda Reid’s Brotherhood of the Popcorn, April Wright’s Going Attractions and Robert A. Emmons Jr’s Diagram for Delinquents. Sponsored by Camden County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Rutgers-Camden Digital, and Rutgers-Camden Department English-Film Studies, the festival screens independent films from around the world while also focusing on the work of local filmmakers in the Camden County and Southern New Jersey area. The Reel East Film Festival will be held August 21st to August, 23rd, at the Ritz Theatre in Oaklyn, NJ.

Festival Prizes:

The Reel East Film Festival’s prizes reflect New Jersey’s deep cinematic roots and history. Our top three prizes are named for inventors and filmmakers whose work played an integral role in the creation of cinema


Edison Prize – The festival’s top prize. The invention of cinema was a global effort. On American shores, particularly in the Garden State, no name is more synonymous with film’s birth than Thomas Alva Edison. With the critical assistance of early film pioneers and technicians like William Dickson, Edison presented the world with the kinetoscope and the Black Maria Studio. And soon the world was captured by the magic of motion pictures.


Porter Prize – An employee of Edison’s, Edwin S. Porter directed over 250 films throughout his career as a writer, director, cinematographer, and producer. Porter was an innovative and inventive filmmaker. His most well known film, The Great Train Robbery(1903), is a critical American film that pioneered new techniques in production and editing that we still see in today’s movies.


Goodwin Prize – Hannibal Goodwin is a largely forgotten but crucial name in American film history. In a modest house in Newark, NJ, Reverend Goodwin invented transparent flexible celluloid film for roller cameras. Goodwin’s patent application was submitted in 1887, two years before George Eastman’s celluloid film patent, but remained
unissued as it underwent several amendments. Goodwin died in 1900, but in 1913 he was posthumously vindicated when it was ruled that Goodwin’s patent had been infringed upon by Eastman.

Achievement in Student Filmmaking Prizes: 


Audacity Prize – Awarded to the student film that demonstrates a unique vision and a willingness to take risks in order to further film as an art form


Jury Prize – Awarded to the student film that demonstrates extraordinary achievement in film.

For more information, please visit our website: www.reeleastfilm.org.
 
 
The “Czar of Noir” Eddie Muller needs no introduction. Over the past two decades, he has become what we could describe as a public intellectual for golden age cinema. If not the scholar of film noir that Foster Hirsch or James Naremore may be, Muller has offered his expertise through a series of readable and addictive noir books (his 1998 Dark City opens with a dialog that parodies 1950’s The Asphalt Jungle, in which Muller states that he killed the professor) and a seemingly nonstop campaign to program the films. Recently, he is the programmer of the Summer of Darkness noir series on Turner Classic Movies, which continues today, through July, as a Friday series. Muller took out some time to discuss the series, his work in film promotion, and his other projects. 

To read the rest of the interview click HERE
 
 
This image basically sums up the entire film. 2 hours of mad motion presenting the collision of a circus, a rock opera and a pirate movie. Just add the sound of smoking hot engines roaring inside your brain and you are almost there. Actually the sound design of MAD MAX FURY ROAD almost trumps the visual design. Besides the obvious "VROOM-VROOOM" of all the cars we get the quiet "tick-tick-tick" sound I immediately recognize as my own humble Mazda engine as it settles once I shut it down. It's a subtle detail that you would normally find in a smaller scale Roman Polanski movie but it's here as part of the huge mad mural painted across your Multiplex screens by George Miller. 

Before we get to the hype about what a masterpiece this movie is-we need to take a rare moment of silence to give the proper respect to Dr. Miller. Yes, Australian auteur George Miller is also an MD and you can see this side of himself in his surprisingly good Disease of the week styled film, LORENZO'S OIL. But we all know Miller best of all for basically inventing a genre out of thin air. Whatever you think of MAD MAX and its follow up films, it's clear that Miller's conception of an anarchic post apocalypse based on fuel shortages and roving tribal gangs has had a huge influence on contemporary action cinema. Like George Romero with the zombie film before him, Miller is the direct foundation of an entire subgenre. For many born years after the release of MAD MAX in 1979, this concept probably feels like something that has always existed, burned into their collective cultural memories along with the idea that a shark in the ocean comes with its own two note musical theme. 

Part of what makes Miller's trilogy (Now a quadrology?) unique is that each film in the series basically stands on its own. The first movie is an exploitation film. A bastard stepchild of the biker flick and the western-It's a simple revenge movie packed with as much action and destruction as possible. The second is a mythic western that presents Max as a MAN WITH NO NAME type of reluctant hero-almost supernatural in his ability to give and take violence. If MAD MAX presented its hero as a rogue cop in a relatively realistic manner then THE ROAD WARRIOR is MAX printed as legend. It even frames the story as being told by the Feral Kid (Emil Minty) years later as an older man. The third film has Tina Turner in it and quite possibly the basis for the UFC. It feels less like George Miller than Ken Russell. Now this one has Bane playing Max so it's not really Max anymore. Max was barely a one line description in a screenplay. Which is why he was never really the kind of character who stood separate from the incredibly charismatic actor who played him, MAD MEL. Gibson could make the most of his six or seven lines of dialogue by widening those eyes, or throwing someone a scowl. He looked pretty insane at times but was underplaying incredibly when compared to the circus swirling around him. 

Obviously casting Mel Gibson in this movie wasn't going to happen. Beyond the age problem (which could've worked to the film's advantage actually) there is the little problem that people have judged and sentenced Gibson to exile from movie stardom due to some unfortunate personal issues. So now we have Tom Hardy-a fine actor but in this particular case a kind of black hole for charisma. He spends the first third of the film with some metal mask on (which makes you wonder what it is about Hardy that makes filmmakers want to place metal devices over his head) and then just kind of sleepwalks through the role with line readings at the level of a whisper. It doesn't really matter anyway since Max is really the supporting character here. Charlize Theron's Furiosa is the lead character without a doubt and she is excellent in the role. The problem is with the role itself which is really beyond underwritten, it's abstract. Basically everything in this film is abstract from a narrative cinema 2015 point of view. It would fit perfectly into a new release of 1924 perhaps. Right from the opening scene you quickly realize that Miller isn't going to stop to explain anything. It's up to you to work out the various good guys and bad guys and to ponder if you wish the thematic idea of a lost matriarchy rising up against a dying patriarchy. It does and does not really matter because what we really have is a visual spectacle on the level of classic Fritz Lang. You are plunged into an EXTREME world. Full of sound and fury. Entering FURY ROAD is like walking into the eye of a hurricane while trying to juggle babies and chainsaws. None of us mere mortals would survive in this world past the opening credits.  

Miller hasn't lost any of his skills to storyboard and execute dazzling action sequences--the tanker assault in THE ROAD WARRIOR being one of the most breathtaking pieces of cinema ever made-but somehow this time it feels less. The addition of CGI continues to be a buzzkill for action films. Who cares how awesome a stunt appears to be or a how huge an explosion is when it's just some guy in an air conditioned office creating it on a computer? One of the benefits of limitations is that it inspires creativity. Filmmakers today have to find the restraint in themselves not to use all of the power of the computer. These images are probably what Miller always had in mind but couldn't quite achieve in the previous films. They are certainly dazzling. But dazzling to the mind rather than the gut. The gut can separate the cool stunt from the CG fireball added to make it supercool. That said, you are not going to find a better action film this summer coming from anywhere. This is the action film as auteur film. It's mad and delirious and high on its own supply and Miller knows just how to frame and cut these scenes so you can just follow it. I just wished I got to know Furiosa a little better. Or any of the characters or if the film had three big action set pieces instead of three hundred. I know it's an odd request to ask for LESS in this time of MORE. I am sure most people will love the overkill. But honestly it just wore me down. By the end I wanted it to be over and I didn't care who lived or died to make that happen.

-Brian Holcomb
 
 
The Insidious: Chapter 3 press tour rolled through Philly last weekend, scaring thrill seekers with its 4DX mobile haunted house. 4DX, short for 4-Dimension Experience, combines classic haunted house jump scares with a state-of-the-art virtual reality experience. When you first enter the trailer you have to adjust your eyes to the enclosed set that has been created for you. As you make your solo journey through the halls you are greeted by surprise skeletons and other jump scares. Finally, you reach your assigned room where a doting attendant assists your transfer into a spirit realm called “The Further.”

Using the Oculus Rift headset and surround-sound headphones, 4DX transports you into the story ofInsidious as a spirit that has left its body. Initially, you find yourself sitting in a pleasant suburban living room. When you look up, down, left, or right the Oculus recognizes so your view changes to what you turn to look at. Loud slams turn your attention to a far window to your right where a figure shrouded behind white curtains attempts to break in. A voice speaks in front of you and you turn to see Elise Rainier (Lin Shaye), the medium from Insidious and Insidious: Chapter 2 explains to you that you are astral projecting. Cool, right? Nope, terrifying because she goes on to explain that the dead are coming for your soul because they want to live again.

Simply, the experience was amazing. After Elise plants you firmly in the situation as a helpless victim you are set loose on a roller coaster of fright. The virtual reality is so intense and immersive that at times you are paralyzed in your seat, fighting to resist the urge to remove the headset to end the fear. It was such a wonderful terror that I found myself wishing it wouldn't end. Certainly, theInsidious: Chapter 3 4DX haunted house showcased the franchise's mastery of horror is back to steal your breath.

--Mark Heaton, Reel East Film Society

 
 
We are busy gearing up for the second annual 2015 Reel East Film Festival. The festival will once again take place at the historic Ritz Theatre in Oaklyn, NJ from Friday August 21st to Sunday August 23rd. 

So today we are opening our In Competition Call for Submissions. The REFF is seeking exciting and unique visions from around the world to present to a fresh regional audience and this year we are not only looking for short films but feature length films as well. 

All will compete for several top prizes including a new category for films made locally. 

Short Films must be less than 40 minutes to qualify 
Feature Films must be more than 60 minutes to qualify

Student films from colleges and Universities worldwide are also invited to submit. 

The Deadline for all submissions is July 17th, 2015. 

For more information and to submit your films go to our page at FILMFREEWAY.COM


 
 
 
Filmmaker Pascal Chind took home two prizes at the first Reel East Film Festival last August for his amazing short film Extreme Pinocchio. Click on the following link to read Pascal's interview at Film International...
 
 
The big winner of the first annual REEL EAST FILM FESTIVAL was Pascal Chind's mind warping, hilarious and disturbing short film EXTREME PINOCCHIO. The Reel East Film Festival is very proud to award the film with its top prize, the Edison. The film is also the recipient of the Audience Prize which was voted by the audience by ballot along with a special citation to actor, Christophe Fluder for his pitch perfect performance in the lead role. 

There will be more information about the prize winners soon but for now we wanted to make the announcement public as soon as we could...so here are our prizes and the winners...

Reel East Film Festival Awards (for Short Films) 

Audience Award - Voted on by festival audience, the Audience Award posses the critical validation of the viewing public. The Audience Award is often a filmmaker's most coveted prize at festivals.

AUDIENCE AWARD: Extreme Pinocchio (Dir: Pascal Chind)

Best of Festival Prizes (3) 

1. Edison Prize - The festival's top prize. The invention of cinema was a global effort. On American shores, particularly in the Garden State, no name is more synonymous with film's birth than Thomas Alva Edison. With the critical assistance of early film pioneers and technicians like William Dickson, Edison presented the world with the kinetoscope and the Black Maria Studio. And soon the world was captured by the magic of motion pictures.

EDISON PRIZE: Extreme Pinocchio (Dir: Pascal Chind)

2. Porter Prize - An employee of Edison's, Edwin S. Porter directed over 250 films throughout his career as a writer, director, cinematographer, and producer. Porter was an innovative and inventive filmmaker. His most well-known film, The Great Train Robbery (1903), is a critical American film that pioneered new techniques in production and editing that we still see in today's movies.

PORTER PRIZE: BROKEN (Dir: Bryan Locantore, Barrett O'Neal, Gang Yi)

3. Goodwin Prize - Hannibal Goodwin is a largely forgotten but crucial name in American film history. In a modest house in Newark, NJ, Reverend Goodwin invented transparent flexible celluloid film for roller cameras. Goodwin's patent application was submitted in 1887, two years before George Eastman's celluloid film patent, but remained unissued as it underwent several amendments. Goodwin died in 1900, but in 1913 he was posthumously vindicated when it was ruled that Goodwin’s patent had been infringed upon by Eastman.


GOODWIN PRIZE: The Story of M (Dir:Anna Arlanova)

Achievement in Student Filmmaking Prizes (2) 

1. Audacity Prize - Awarded to the student film that demonstrates a unique vision and a willingness to take risks in order to further film as an art form.

AUDACITY PRIZE: TOUGH CASE (Dir: Stefan Perez)

2. Jury Prize - Awarded to the student film that demonstrates extraordinary achievement in film.

JURY PRIZE: Spirit of Negation (Dir: Alexander Kuribayashi)





 

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