The Second Annual Reel East Film Festival is now a thing of the past. For all of us working tirelessly to bring this ambitious undertaking to you, the festival was always a thing of the future. As with most things looked forward to, it went by so fast it was hard to process. So we will spend the next few days slowly processing what we experienced and to present some of those highlights here to you, but for now we present you with our official 2015 award winners. Remember, Reel East hands out six major prizes which can go to either a short or a feature depending on quality. We would like to thank all of the filmmakers who submitted this year. Without your interest and involvement we would have nothing to present. We are proud of all of you for your hard work and discipline. 

EDISON PRIZE-Children of the Night (Argentina) Dir: Ivan Noel
PORTER PRIZE-Revolving Child (USA) Dir: Francisco Cabrera
GOODWIN PRIZE- It's a Frame Up! (USA) Dir: Michael Schlesinger   
AUDACITY PRIZE-  Emily DiPrimio for CARVER                                                                                                                      
JURY PRIZE-Subterranea (USA) Dir: Matthew Miller
REGIONAL PRIZE- Disco Zal (USA) Dir: Sean McKnight                                                                                                                      
 
 
Friday, August 21
7:30 – Opening Film: Carver (Local Horror Feature) with director Emily DiPrimio in attendance for a Q and A

In the tradition of the past returning to haunt the present, Carver features a group of teens who regret a despicable act they committed years earlier. Their actions had left three dead, and now, on the anniversary of the crimes, an ominous carved pumpkin is found at each of their homes. Revenge may come in human or nonhuman form in this suspenseful tale of dread by a fresh new voice in filmmaking.
10:30 – Children of the Night (Horror, Argentina, Subtitled)

Alice, a reporter, is invited to investigate Limbo, where children live with the mysterious disease, Transylvirus, in this new dark thriller from Argentina written and directed by Iván Noel (originally titled Limbo). At first, not sure what to believe, Alice carefully traipses around Limbo with caution, speaking with Erda, the children's caretaker, and observing the children's unique habits. Siegfried, "a sinner with an angel's face" is much too interested in Alice, even knowing some disturbing truths about her pasts. Although Alice wants to leave Limbo, she can't, and she soon finds out the truth about what keeps the children grounded there and inspired their disturbing behavior.

Preceded by the in-Competition Student Short film, Spirit from the Meadow by Joant Ubeda 
Picture
LATE NIGHT

PRIVY by Dave Finkelstein

A young woman is forced to live with an unsympathetic stepmother, and spends much of her time in an outhouse, escaping into books and her own vivid fantasy life. “Privy” uses oblique, poetic language, fanciful images and musical interludes to depict her daydreams and her evolving plans for escape. Based on an improvisation by actors David Finkelstein and Ian W. Hill.
Saturday, August 22nd

10:30AM-Short Film Selections
The Emotional Dimensions of the James River by Michelle Marquez (Student Short)
Revolving Child by Franciso Cabrera (Student Short)
Sliver by Melissa Rillera 
Flower by Lucas Ruderman (Student Short)
11am – Subterranea (Science Fiction)

In this powerful and suspenseful thriller, a man known simply as “The Captive” is released into society from a dark cell where he has spent his entire life. He eventually discovers what occurred during his mysterious past as he confronts people and clues to the puzzle that have been been part of his enigmatic existence. Inspired by an album by British progressive rock band IQ, this stylish and creepy film stars Bug Hall, William Katt, Nicholas Turturro and Lily Gladstone, and was stylishly directed by newcomer Mathew Miller and produced by South Jersey's Eric D. Wilkinson (Jerome Bixby’s The Man from Earth, Mischief Night, which he also co-wrote).

Subterreana was just awarded the Grand Prize at this year's Vortex Sci-Fi and Fantasy Awards.
Picture
1:00pm-Short Film Selections
The Joke's on you by Adrian Colon
Brewing by Nick Corrao (Student Short)
2pm – Crime Double Feature: Black Cat Whiskey (Narrative) and A Tale of Two Thieves (True Crime Documentary)

Black Cat Whiskey – In a small rural town hit hard by the Depression, a gal bumps off her bootlegging husband when she begins to receive inopportune visits by his old business partners about a large shipment of moonshine in her possession. 

A Tale of Two Thieves – In 1963 in the countryside in England, fifteen men pulled off the real-life “The Great Train Robbery” netting today's equivalent of $85 million. Featuring Gordon Goody, one of the instigators of the crime, for the first time ever, revealing the identity of the missing mastermind behind Britain's most famous heist: the elusive and mysterious “Ulsterman.”

Program to be preceded by the documentary short film Bleeding Black and Yellow by Justin Clayton along with a Q and A by Matt Tremont. 
5:30 – A Fuller Life (Documentary)
Picture
Legendary filmmaker Samuel Fuller was a bigger-than-life character, who started working for tabloid newspapers when just a teen, became a screenwriter in Hollywood, captured key battles of World War II with his camera and became the writer-director behind such classics as Pickup on South Street, The Steel Helmet, The Crimson Kimono, Shock Corridor and The Big Red One, based on his experiences during WWII. Fuller also courted controversy for his two-fisted style and tackling sensitive issues like racism, mental illness and patriotism. His daughter Samantha Fuller paints a loving portrait of her father with this documentary in which such admirers as William Friedkin, Jennifer Beals, Joe Dante, Wim Wenders, James Franco, Buck Henry and Mark Hamill read excerpts from his compelling autobiography “A Third Face” while photos and film clips help paint a complete portrait of a bigger-than-life auteur.
8pm – Feature Screening (with awards announced): 7 Chinese Brothers

Jason Schwartzman co-stars with his dog Arrow, Tunde Adebimpe (from the band “TV on the Radio”), Olympia Dukakis, and Stephen Root in this 2015 SXSW film making its local premiere. Schwartzman is Larry, an inebriated sad sack who rides a tide of booze onto the shores of an undiscriminating Quick-Lube. The only bright spot is probably his boss, Lupe (Eleanore Pienta). Will Larry keep it together long enough to win the girl, provide for his French bulldog, laze about with his friend Major (Adebimpe), and do his cantankerous grandmother (Olympia Dukakis) proud? Writer-director Bob Byington’s comedy sports irreverence at its best. 

Preceded by the short film, Disco Zal by Sean Mcknight
Picture
10:30pm – King and Company Horror Short Films

This series will feature our second annual selection of short films based on the work of Stephen King. Known as "Dollar Babies" since King charges a mere dollar for the non-exclusive rights to adapt his work for educational and festival screenings, these rarely seen adaptations will be presented along with the following independent horror shorts in competition:  

Step One: The Esoteric by Dennis Paullin (Student Short)
Klaus by Daniel Scarpati (Student Short)
The Monster by Han Cheng (Student Short)
#10-32:Drowning by Yuyeol Chun (Student Short)

Sunday, August 23

10:30am – Orson Welles’ Chimes at Midnight (1965) 
Picture
Orson Welles' brilliant but largely unseen film restructures Shakespeare by using both parts of Henry IV, with pieces of Richard II and Henry V and reinterpreting the famous character of Falstaff, one of Shakespeare's greatest comic characters (and a father figure to the future King of England). With Falstaff as the central figure, this tragic-comic story of friendship and inevitable betrayal displays wonderful performances and Welles’ cinematic virtuosity. The intense and dazzlingly edited battle sequence influenced countless films from Braveheart to Saving Private Ryan
Picture
Sunday's program will open at 10:30am with IT’S A FRAME-UP! a short film from the makers of A Dark and Stormy Night,  The Lost Skeleton Returns Again (a sequel to the acclaimed The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra) and Trail of the Screaming Forehead.

“I can't think of any other intentional comedies of recent years that have given me so many, or so many varied, big laughs in the space of 30 minutes. It makes what has basically been a dead art form for the past 50 years feel vital once again.”—Tim Lucas, Video Watchdog

The movie that sets comedy back 80 years--to when it was, y'know, actually funny. Those merry madcaps of mayhem, Biffle & Shooster, star in an all-new made-in-1938 short (in B&W, of course) that finds them landing jobs in an art gallery--on the very day a priceless painting has been delivered. You can figure out what happens next. Renowned classic film distributor and independent producer Michael Schlesinger pours his love of Old Hollywood into an authentic-as-possible recreation of the glory days of comedy teams, replete with snappy dialogue, grievous puns, plenty of slapstick, familiar-seeming character actors and even impressions--plus a plot twist or two. Who says they can’t make ‘em like they used to? 

(2013, B&W, 1.33:1, 28 min.)
Scr/Prod/Dir: Michael Schlesinger
Cast: Nick Santa Maria, Will Ryan, Daniel Roebuck, Robert Picardo, Andrew Parks, Alison Martin, Sybil Darrow  
1:00PM-Short film Selections
Lily by Eric Henry (Student Short)
The Distinguished by William Martinko (Student Short)
Picture
2pm – The Phantom of the Opera (1925) silent feature with live piano accompaniment by Steve Weber, marking the 90th anniversary of this silent Lon Chaney horror classic
 
 
The decision to screen A Fuller Life, the documentary about maverick filmmaker Samuel Fuller continues the Reel East Film Festival’s interest to create a platform to look back to film history. Last year’s inaugural edition of the festival saw screenings of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lodger (1927) and Humphrey Bogart’s All Through The Night (1942), alongside April Wright’s new documentary Going Attractions (2013) that celebrated the story of the American drive-in movie. This year’s festival presents one daughter’s tribute to her filmmaker father.

Samantha Fuller has painstakingly merged the words of her father’s autobiography A Third Face with the moving image, marrying words and pictures that were along with music Fuller’s primary colours. Whether it was non-fiction news reporting during his newspaper days, recording the events of World War II from the front lines while serving in the infantry or even narrative filmmaking, Fuller was a natural born storyteller with a nose for a good story. As Samantha explains: “What really triggered his enlistment was that it was the biggest crime story of the century, and instead of becoming a war correspondent which was offered to him, he decided to go on the front lines as an infantry man to experience it the most.”

This tribute to her father has afforded the first time director an opportunity to more intimately understand the filmmaking process that was a significant part of his life. “It is the best schooling that I can get because even though I was raised on film sets and in the film industry, it is very different to being hands-on.”

In conversation with The Reel East Film Festival Fuller took us behind the scenes of the making of A Fuller Life to discuss creating a parallel journey between words and pictures, connecting the passages with the individual speakers, her expectations versus the realities and how she is far from done in bringing Samuel Fuller’s life to the screen.

Sam Fuller was a newspaperman who then went into films. So from the written word to the stills camera and then onto moving pictures, A Fuller Life which is adapted from his autobiography feels like a fitting tribute in which you have taken the autobiography on a similar journey. 

Right, and it just felt so natural. I never had to overthink it and once I had the idea that I was going to make this film then there was nothing that was going to stop me. But I really didn't know what would come of it. I haven't been to film school let alone make a documentary, and so I put my own spin on this film in the sense that it is not your conventional documentary format, which also seems so fitting to my father who didn't make conventional films. So just compiling interviews and telling his life story with someone else's narrative didn't feel right. But yeah, it just felt very natural. 

Honestly it felt like he was channeling this film, and so much so that despite the fact that many institutions have asked for his archives, there is a reason I left his office untouched for all these years. Somehow I couldn't part with it because it is just a great place for me to go and spend time with him still. It is sort of like a shrine. You walk into the shack and you feel his presence in there to the point that when I enter I still say: "Hey dad.” It is like living in his grave. You see all the research and all of the materials he's compiled over the years and so it's a great set for a film. I don’t think any art director could have put that together because there are so many authentic items and it just felt like he was: okay, let's do this honey. You want to party, come party in the shack. [Laughs]

It was a great celebration in the sense that it took us about a year to get the film made. The biggest challenge was coordinating everybody's schedule, but once we got together in one place it was magic. It had a natural flow to it, but it was difficult to get the cast and the crew to volunteer their time because everyone is very professional, employed and busy. So once we got together it took about a year to get all the shooting done and the average time would be one reader a month. So we basically spent the year of 2012 - the year of his centennial - celebrating that entire year. And honestly, we spent more time having drinks and wonderful meals that my mother cooked every time we had a shoot. We spent more time just having fun and commemorating my dad than actually shooting, and in the spirit of my father I did a lot of shots in one take as I really wanted to train myself in the Fuller film school. So even though we were shooting digitally I felt like it would be a challenge to try and get it right the first time and keep it as natural as possible. I really didn't want anyone to over prepare and so I sent the readers the text, they came in, sat in the chair and we just hit roll.

What was the process behind choosing the different readers and did you have a wish list?

It's amazing how I feel like everyone is very connected to the passage that they read, even though some of them were not my first choice nor my first thought. But it wound up being that those who did get the part just fell into place with it. So that was again another challenge because as I was saying about everyone's timing, there were certain people like Scorsese - just to mention one - that I would have liked to have had because he was a big admirer of my father and he wrote the introduction to his autobiography. But I just couldn't fit him into the schedule and I was determined to shoot this film during 2012. So if someone told me I'd have to wait six months to get it done, I just moved onto the next thought. So everyone was cast in a very subtle manner, but I can give you an example of somone who had not worked with my father directly and the reason why I chose to give him the part.

Since they never worked together and hadn't even met for that matter James Franco is the most disconnected out of everyone. Franco was a very young man the first time he came up to our house. He was eighteen and my father had already passed away. It was during the time he was doing the James Dean part for Showtime. We had a friend in town who was interested in casting him in a feature film. Franco came up and had the meeting with this French director in our home, as they were our houseguest at the time. Franco's eyes lit up when he realised he was in Fuller's house and he knew all about my dad. For such a young man - and a lot of times these days you'll meet these actors who don't have so much film culture - he his a true cinephile, and it was very impressive to see to what extent he knew about my father. So I chose him to be in this film and I wanted to kick-off the film with the youngest actor onboard. But I could also feel a lot of connections between Franco and my father in the sense that he's a renaissance man and so was my dad - fearless and ready to take on any job. Between writing and directing, and while okay my dad wasn't an actor, he was a cartoonist and James is also an artist; a prolific artist and just as open to all the forms of artistic channeling that he can take in. My father was like that too - ready to explore any artistic medium. So that's the reason James was in the film.
Jennifer Beals made a film with my father in the nineties for French television [The Madonna and the Dragon (1990)] where she played a young journalist and my father played her editor. And so when it came time to speak about his early crime reporting years she was very fitting to read the part, although initially it was going to be James Ellroy, because he wrote a whole series of books called Underworld USA (1995-2009) that were inspired by my dad's film. But we were playing ping-pong on scheduling and I was very happy in the end to have a woman to channel my father because he was a woman's filmmaker and he adored Jennifer Beals. They had a great time working together and we have remained friends for all these years. My dad actually worked with her ex-husband too [Alex Rockwell] and they made several films together. So we go way back with Jennifer and Alex who are good family friends and so she was very fitting to read that crime reporting segment. I was very pleased when she showed up in a men's suit... I didn't actually tell the actors what to wear, I just said: "Be yourselves." Those who really knew my dad well like Wim Wenders knew that my father loved a white jacket, and so he came dressed in one [laughs]. So did Bill Duke actually - he came in a cream colored suit. My father loved light jackets and his role model was Mark Twain who always wore a white jacket. So Wim Wenders and Bill Duke both knew that and surprised me by coming in a white jacket, which was really fun. So yeah, somehow when I chose the passages to read in the book and I thought of the reader who would be reading them, I tried to feel who would connect to each passage the most.

The focus was on channeling Sam by which you move towards that feeling, and in doing so the audience get that same sense. It strikes me that you were methodical in your approach.

Yeah, and somehow it was methodical, but it was not overthought. It happened almost magically somehow in which these passages related so well to the reader. It happened to be a couple of years ago that my mother, daughter and myself went to visit the Czech Republic. We went to the Karlovy Film Festival and Monte Hellman who is a dear family friend was one of the guests. We happened to be together at the festival at the same time and so we went out and retraced my father's footsteps when he was in Czechoslovakia during World War II - when he freed the camps. So Monte Hellman was present at the time that we revisited the camps and it also happened magically that I had him. He happens to be my neighbor here in Los Angeles and so he couldn't be more fitting to read that passage about the camps having recently experienced the visit there. Not that he looks like a camp survivor himself, but we were always joking [laughs] and he was: “I know what you really wanted me for that part for.” No, it was because he could relate to that having been there. Everyone just fell into place and it was so gratifying to just get this done despite not even knowing that I'd open it at a film festival. I honestly thought I had to make it no matter where it was going to wind up. Once again it was my film school and so I really didn't know, and it was a real challenge to foresee what was going to happen with it. But it didn't matter to me where it was going to land and it was to my great surprise that the Venice Film Festival took it into their Classics Selection in 2013. This was great because that really boosted the film and kicked it off to a worldwide festival tour that has played everywhere from the Midnight Film Festival in Lapland, South Korea in Jeonju to São Paulo in Brazil. I am thrilled for my dad who I made this film for that it is getting such great exposure. He was an exceptional man and I am not saying that just because I am his daughter. Just seeing him from a more objective perspective he's one of a kind and he was so generous with his stories and willing to mentor anyone he liked. He mentored many young filmmakers and writers, and I think he his just such an inspiration and motivation. You ‘d just want to conquer the world after spending time with him and that's how I grew up every day - fearless and always ready to take on a challenge. And this is the message that I wanted to come through in the film.

Speaking with you I realise how the people closest to the artists or the filmmakers themselves see something so radically different to what we see, and it makes one appreciate the work all the more for its individuality.

I've got to say that I'm passionate and I feel so blessed to have that because it is such a privilege. Not so many people have parents who leave so much behind. A lot of people lose their parents and are lucky to have some photographs and memories, but for me the fact that I have all of his films, the great interviews with him and his journals is such a blessing. I feel so privileged in that sense to be the daughter of someone who would record everything. 

Looking back on the experience how did the reality compare to your original expectations? 

Oh, it was so much better. Once again I didn't know what I was getting into. I hadn't been to film school, but luckily when I did this I was working with professionals. To be able to direct Billy Friedkin, Wim Wenders, Tim Roth… Everybody put me at such ease and gave me so many tips. Seamus McGarvey who was our main DP is just a master of lighting, and when we discussed about bringing the room to life and trying to shoot as many angles as possible he did such a great job. So I learned everything and in fact right now I am doing my own distribution - I am signing with Criterion and I am doing all my own distribution deals. I am learning from A-Z; from the initial thought to getting it out there. It is the best schooling that I can get because even though I was raised on film sets and in the film industry, it is very different to being hands-on. Every time I would be on my dad’s set as a kid I would really be hanging out at the craft service, with hair and makeup and wardrobe. I'd look at storyboards and look at a distance as my dad would shoot, but I really wanted to stay out of his way on the set. So he never trained me in that sense and even though I had witnessed it growing up, it is a very different experience to actually doing it. I honestly really have a knack for it and I really enjoy the whole process… I love the show. But the business is way more difficult. It takes a lot more psychology than I thought and right now I am in the middle of dealing with the numbers game when it comes to signing distribution contracts, and that's more stressful than anything else. 

And looking ahead to the future, what does it hold for you?

What happened also is I had already had the idea of making the film when I started to really dig in deep to my father's archives, to find material I could use for the film. This was when I came upon this box under the desk with over an hundred reels of 16mm film. I wound through them and to my big surprise it was film of him during World War II - just a few seconds here and there of him on film while he was in the infantry. And it was almost like my dad had said: “If you are going to make a film about me then you had better include this footage.” [Laughs] Now is the time to look through this box. 

You've seen the shack through the film, but there is draw after draw and stacks and rows of books. There is so much to go through and I am alone in this - I don't have any siblings and it pretty much breaks my mother's heart to go in there. So I am alone in there and it is a huge legacy and it is very time consuming. This is why I have only been doing little dabs at a time when I want to spend time with my dad. I have another job - I am a glass artist and rent a home business. So I didn't have a full time schedule to be able to go into the shack. However, when we started making the film I really put more time aside to dig through the material and that's when I came upon these films. I had them transferred and it's about two and a half hours of him on location scouts and of footage of him during World War II. Now I was only able to include a couple of minutes of this in the film and so I have all these remains of awesome archival footage that he shot with his camera. So I have now started a second documentary that goes a little more in depth into his war experience. We are using the rest of his war footage and tearing it up with readings of his war correspondence that he wrote back to his mother and brother from the front lines. It is called Organized Insanity and I don't know where that is going to go. It could also become a special feature for the DVD release or it'll probably have a little festival life of its own. We'll see what happens with that, but I'm in the midst of editing over three hundred letters and cartoons, wonderful illustrations and the funniest... He was such a great satirical cartoonist and I have such funny sketches of Hitler as a soldier. He lived through every major battle: North Africa, Sicily and D-Day all the way through to the camps and he documented everything in writing through his journals, war letters and cartoons. So I am going to revive all of this material as well.
-Paul Risker
 
 
Friday, August 21
7:30 – Opening Film: Carver (Local Horror Feature) with director Emily DiPrimio in attendance for a Q and A
In the tradition of the past returning to haunt the present, Carver features a group of teens who regret a despicable act they committed years earlier. Their actions had left three dead, and now, on the anniversary of the crimes, an ominous carved pumpkin is found at each of their homes. Revenge may come in human or nonhuman form in this suspenseful tale of dread by a fresh new voice in filmmaking.

10:30 – Children of the Night (Horror, Argentina, Subtitled)
Alice, a reporter, is invited to investigate Limbo, where children live with the mysterious disease, Transylvirus, in this new dark thriller from Argentina written and directed by Iván Noel (originally titled Limbo). At first, not sure what to believe, Alice carefully traipses around Limbo with caution, speaking with Erda, the children's caretaker, and observing the children's unique habits. Siegfried, "a sinner with an angel's face" is much too interested in Alice, even knowing some disturbing truths about her pasts. Although Alice wants to leave Limbo, she can't, and she soon finds out the truth about what keeps the children grounded there and inspired their disturbing behavior.
Picture
Saturday, August 22

11am – Subterranea (Science Fiction)
In this powerful and suspenseful thriller, a man known simply as “The Captive” is released into society from a dark cell where he has spent his entire life. He eventually discovers what occurred during his mysterious past as he confronts people and clues to the puzzle that have been been part of his enigmatic existence. Inspired by an album by British progressive rock band IQ, this stylish and creepy film stars Bug Hall, William Katt, Nicholas Turturro and Lily Gladstone, and was stylishly directed by newcomer Mathew Miller and produced by South Jersey's Eric D. Wilkinson (Jerome Bixby’s The Man from EarthMischief Night, which he also co-wrote).

Subterreana was just awarded the Grand Prize at this year's Vortex Sci-Fi and Fantasy Awards. 

2pm – Crime Double Feature: Black Cat Whiskey (Narrative) and A Tale of Two Thieves (True Crime Documentary)


Black Cat Whiskey – In a small rural town hit hard by the Depression, a gal bumps off her bootlegging husband when she begins to receive inopportune visits by his old business partners about a large shipment of moonshine in her possession. 
A Tale of Two Thieves – In 1963 in the countryside in England, fifteen men pulled off the real-life “The Great Train Robbery” netting today's equivalent of $85 million. Featuring Gordon Goody, one of the instigators of the crime, for the first time ever, revealing the identity of the missing mastermind behind Britain's most famous heist: the elusive and mysterious “Ulsterman.”
5:30 – A Fuller Life (Documentary)
Legendary filmmaker Samuel Fuller was a bigger-than-life character, who started working for tabloid newspapers when just a teen, became a screenwriter in Hollywood, captured key battles of World War II with his camera and became the writer-director behind such classics as Pickup on South Street, The Steel Helmet, The Crimson Kimono, Shock Corridor and The Big Red One, based on his experiences during WWII. Fuller also courted controversy for his two-fisted style and tackling sensitive issues like racism, mental illness and patriotism. His daughter Samantha Fuller paints a loving portrait of her father with this documentary in which such admirers as William Friedkin, Jennifer Beals, Joe Dante, Wim Wenders, James Franco, Buck Henry and Mark Hamill read excerpts from his compelling autobiography “A Third Face” while photos and film clips help paint a complete portrait of a bigger-than-life auteur.
8pm – Feature Screening (with awards announced): 7 Chinese Brothers

Jason Schwartzman co-stars with his dog Arrow, Tunde Adebimpe (from the band “TV on the Radio”), Olympia Dukakis, and Stephen Root in this 2015 SXSW film making its local premiere. Schwartzman is Larry, an inebriated sad sack who rides a tide of booze onto the shores of an undiscriminating Quick-Lube. The only bright spot is probably his boss, Lupe (Eleanore Pienta). Will Larry keep it together long enough to win the girl, provide for his French bulldog, laze about with his friend Major (Adebimpe), and do his cantankerous grandmother (Olympia Dukakis) proud? Writer-director Bob Byington’s comedy sports irreverence at its best. 
Picture
10:30pm – King and Company Horror Short Films
This series will feature our second annual selection of short films based on the work of Stephen King. Known as "Dollar Babies" since King charges a mere dollar for the non-exclusive rights to adapt his work for educational and festival screenings, these rarely seen adaptations will be presented along with other independent horror shorts both in and out of competition.  
Picture
Sunday-August 23rd
10:30am – Orson Welles’ Chimes at Midnight (1965)

Orson Welles' brilliant but largely unseen film restructures Shakespeare by using both parts of Henry IV, with pieces of Richard II and Henry V and reinterpreting the famous character of Falstaff, one of Shakespeare's greatest comic characters (and a father figure to the future King of England). With Falstaff as the central figure, this tragic-comic story of friendship and inevitable betrayal displays wonderful performances and Welles’ cinematic virtuosity. The intense and dazzlingly edited battle sequence influenced countless films from Braveheart to Saving Private Ryan.   
Picture
Sunday's program will open at 10:30am with IT’S A FRAME-UP! a short film from the makers of A Dark and Stormy Night,  The Lost Skeleton Returns Again (a sequel to the acclaimed The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra) and Trail of the Screaming Forehead.

“I can't think of any other intentional comedies of recent years that have given me so many, or so many varied, big laughs in the space of 30 minutes. It makes what has basically been a dead art form for the past 50 years feel vital once again.”—Tim Lucas, Video Watchdog

The movie that sets comedy back 80 years--to when it was, y'know, actually funny. Those merry madcaps of mayhem, Biffle & Shooster, star in an all-new made-in-1938 short (in B&W, of course) that finds them landing jobs in an art gallery--on the very day a priceless painting has been delivered. You can figure out what happens next. Renowned classic film distributor and independent producer Michael Schlesinger pours his love of Old Hollywood into an authentic-as-possible recreation of the glory days of comedy teams, replete with snappy dialogue, grievous puns, plenty of slapstick, familiar-seeming character actors and even impressions--plus a plot twist or two. Who says they can’t make ‘em like they used to? 


(2013, B&W, 1.33:1, 28 min.)
Scr/Prod/Dir: Michael Schlesinger
Cast: Nick Santa Maria, Will Ryan, Daniel Roebuck, Robert Picardo, Andrew Parks, Alison Martin, Sybil Darrow
Picture
2pm – The Phantom of the Opera (1925) silent feature with live piano accompaniment by Steve Weber, marking the 90th anniversary of this silent Lon Chaney horror classic

Short Films in Competition 
Disco Zal by Sean McKnight 
The Joke’s on You by Adrian Colon 
Bleeding Black and Yellow by Justin Clayton
Privy by David Finkelstein 
Revolving Child by Franciso Cabrera 
Sliver by Melissa Rillera 
#10-32:Drowning by Yuyeol Chun 
Encounters with Hope in Cambodia by Chae Yoon Jang and Chae Youn Jang 
Klaus by Daniel Scarpati 
Lily by Eric Henry
Flower by Lucas Ruderman 
Step One: The Esoteric by Dennis Paullin 
Spirit from the Meadow by Joant Ubeda 
The Distinguished by William Martinko 
The Emotional Dimensions of the James River by Michelle Marquez 

Short Films will be separated into groups to be played before selected feature films throughout the festival. The times will be listed soon...

 

    Focus

    The Reel East Film Society is honored to bring independent and upcoming feature films and shorts to Camden County and greater South Jersey

    Reel East Film Festival proudly accepts entries via FilmFreeway.com, the world's best online submissions platform. FilmFreeway offers free HD online screeners, Vimeo and YouTube integration, and more. Click to submit with FilmFreeway.

    Archives

    August 2015
    July 2015
    June 2015
    May 2015
    April 2015
    August 2014
    July 2014

    Categories

    All

      Subscribe to our mailing list